Our Patron Saints

This website is under patronage of...

The term "Patron" is used by many Christian Churches, including the Roman Catholic Church, to describe holy and virtuous men and women who are considered to be protectors of a specific group of people, causes, activities, countries, cities, regions etc. We dedicate this website and our project to The Blessed Virgin Mary and place our work and ourselves under the protection of our patron saints: St Luke the Evangelist, St Helena of Constantinople, St Veronica of Jerusalem and St Bernard of Clairvaux.

Saint Veronica of Jerusalem

Veronica (latinisation of Berenice, a Greek-Macedonian name, meaning "bearer of victory"), was a pious matron of Jerusalem or Caesarea Philippi from the 1st century AD, and traditionally identified as the niece of Herod I the Great (37-4 BC, King of Judea). Veronica saw Jesus covered in sweat and blood while being shouted at and spit upon by a furious crowd on His way to the Calvary (also known as Golgotha, a site immediately outside Jerusalem's walls where Jesus was crucified). When Jesus fell, Veronica was so moved, that she stepped out of the angry crowd, made her way through it to come closer, knelt in front of Jesus and used her linen veil to gently wipe His face. The soldiers pushed Veronica away, and when she looked at the cloth again, she realized that an image of Jesus' face had miraculously got imprinted on it. That piece of cloth became known as the "Veil of Veronica" and venerated as one of the beloved relics, as well as the legend of Veronica became one of the most popular in Christian lore. Her simple act of charity and kindness still resonates and is commemorated on the Sixth Station of the Cross (series of images depicting scenes from the Passion of Christ). Veronica is celebrated today by the Catholic, Orthodox, Lutheran and Anglican Churches on July 12, and she is regarded as the patron saint of domestic workers, linen-weavers, maids and photographers.

 

Image: "Saint Veronica with the Veil", detail, 1655-60, by Mattia Preti (1613-1699), an Italian Baroque artist and member of the Order of St John in Malta. 

Credits

image source: Mattia Preti [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Text sources: Wikipedia, Catholic Online, New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia, Eternal Word Television Network, CatholicSaints.Info, Santi beati e Testimoni.

Saint Luke the Evangelist

Luke, one of the Four Evangelists (including John, Mark and Matthew, the authors of the four canonical Gospel accounts of Jesus Christ), was a physician, native of a Greek pagan family in the Hellenistic city of Antioch, in today Syria. After converting to the Christian faith, Luke became a fellow-worker of the apostle Paul, accompanying him during several journeys and confinements. Luke is one of the most extensive writers of the New Testament: the early church fathers ascribed to him the authorship of both "the Gospel according to Luke", that he compiled from Paul’s preaching, and the book of "Acts of the Apostles", an account of the beginnings of the Christian Church telling of events up to Paul’s first stay and imprisonment in Rome. Luke's works are regarded in the tradition of the high Greek historiography and Luke himself as a first-rank historian thanks to the accurate details and evocative atmospheres of his writings. The reports of Luke's life after Paul's death are conflicting. Some early writers claim he was martyred, others say he lived a long life. Luke is often depicted with an ox or a calf, the symbols of the sacrifice Jesus made for us all. Luke's feast day takes place on October 18, and he is regarded as the patron saint of physicians, surgeons, students and also artists, being credited, according to a pious tradition, of the earliest iconic depictions of Jesus Christ and the Virgin Mary.

 

Image: "St. Luke", mid 18th century icon by an anonymous author, from the Priluki village in Belarus, now in the Old Belarusian History Museum in Minsk. 

Credits

Image source: See page for author [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Text sources: Wikipedia, Catholic Online, New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia, Eternal Word Television Network, CatholicSaints.Info, Santi beati e Testimoni.

Saint Helena of Constantinople

Flavia Iulia Helena (c. 246/50 - c. 330 AD), a native of Roman province Bithynia, in Asia Minor, today Turkey, was the first wife of Constantius Chlorus (c. 250-306, Roman general and then Emperor from 293), and the mother of Constantine the Great (272-337), who became Roman Emperor in 312. Helena represents an important figure in the history of the world due to her role in contributing to place Christianity at the heart of the Western Civilization, being revered as a saint by the Orthodox, Catholic and Anglican Churches, as well as commemorated by the Lutheran Church. Constantine honoured Helena with the title of Augusta, and gave her unlimited access to the imperial treasury to locate the relics of Judeo-Christian tradition. Helena performed many acts of charity and piety in life, and in 326/328, although already aged, she undertook a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, where she is credited with the miracolous discovery of the True Cross (remnants of the cross upon which Jesus was crucified) hidden for centuries. Helena's feast day takes place on August 18 according to the Catholic Church, while it is celebrated on May 21 by the Orthodox, Anglican and Lutheran Churches. Helena is regarded as the patron saint of new discoveries, archaeologists, converts, empresses, and Saint Helena, a volcanic island located in the South Atlantic Ocean and famous for being the place of Napoleon's exile and death.

 

Image: "St. Helena of Constantinople", detail, 1495, by Giovanni Battista Cima (Cima da Conegliano c.1459–c.1517), an Italian Renaissance painter.

Credits

Image source: Cima da Conegliano [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Text sources: Wikipedia, Catholic Online, New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia, Eternal Word Television Network, CatholicSaints.Info, Santi beati e Testimoni.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153 AD), one of the most illustrious influencers and spiritual masters of all times, as well as the leader of the reforming Cistercian monastic order, was born in Fontaine-lès-Dijon, in France, to a family belonging to the Burgundian nobility. In 1113 Bernard joined the Cistercian monks, and in 1115 he found a new abbey, naming it Claire Vallée, which evolved into Clairvaux, grew quickly and became soon an influencing model for the monastic reform throughout Europe. Thanks to his dynamism and will, grace and charity, humility and wisdom, Bernard's reputation quickly spread far and wide, and he was sought as an advisor and mediator by the ruling powers of his age, including popes. In 1128, at the Council of Troyes, Bernard traced the outlines of the Latin Rule of the Knights Templar, who became soon the ideal of Christian nobility. Despite suffering of a chronic physical debility all over his life, Bernard wrote many works about theology and mariology, and founded hundreds of new monasteries until his death in 1153. He was proclaimed saint in 1174, and in 1830 "Doctor of the Church" (from Latin "doctor", teacher), a title given by several Christian Churches to individuals for their contribution to theology or doctrine. Bernard's feast day takes place on August 20, and he is regarded as the patron saint of candlemakers, beekepers, Burgundy and the Knights Templar.

 

Image: "Saint Bernard of Clairvaux writing" by Philippe Quantin (1600-1636), a French painter.

Credits

Image source: By Yelkrokoyade (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Text sources: Wikipedia, Catholic Online, New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia, Eternal Word Television Network, CatholicSaints.Info, Santi beati e Testimoni.

 

 

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Featured image: copyright Historia Vivens

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